The California Energy Commission adopted a new version of their energy codes for 2016. The new code went into effect 1/1/2017.

Tags

, ,

energycodes – excerpt

Commercial: The 2016 Building Energy Efficiency Standards, comprising Title 24, Parts 1 and 6, of the California Code of Regulations, is mandatory statewide. Local government agencies may adopt and enforce energy efficiency standards for newly constructed buildings, additions, alterations, and repairs provided the California Energy Commission finds that the standards will require buildings to consume no more energy than permitted by Title 24, Part 6. Such local standards may include adopting the requirements of Title 24, Part 6 before their effective date, requiring additional energy conservation measures, or setting stricter energy budgets…

Residential: The 2016 Building Energy Efficiency Standards, comprising Title 24, Parts 1 and 6, of the California Code of Regulations, is mandatory statewide. Local government agencies may adopt and enforce energy efficiency standards for newly constructed buildings, additions, alterations, and repairs provided the California Energy Commission finds that the standards will require buildings to consume no more energy than permitted by Title 24, Part 6. Such local standards may include adopting the requirements of Title 24, Part 6 before their effective date, requiring additional energy conservation measures, or setting more stricter energy budgets…(more)

There is much talk about the energy codes as they relate to solar powered roofs and California state mandates. There is a lot of disagreement over how costs effective the individual roof systems are, and so far there is no protection from future shadows cast by future buildings that could make the systems totally useless, These codes appear to be written by the Energy Commission and are not part of the legislative process. However, there could be some legislation we have not found yet. The subject is dense and heavy with details.

We look forward to a more simple explanation of what the code requirements are and how they are implemented across the state and will post updates.

 

Advertisements

California solar panel mandate an absolute con job: Republican Party chairman

Tags

, ,

By Julia Limitone : foxbusiness – excerpt (includes video)

California was the first state in the U.S. to require new homes to be built with solar panels, but regulators may have misrepresented details to validate the economic benefits to consumers, according to an opinion piece in The Wall Street Journal. According to the story, energy regulators hired a consultant that low-balled the costs and estimated benefits of solar panels in homes.

The proposal is set to go into effect in 2020 and applies to any homes or building up to three stories, but excludes homes in shade and those unable to be fitted for installation… (more)

I’m not taking a position on the statements regarding the costs. As energy costs and technology shift, the costs benefits analysis cannot be accurate too far into the future. Other states have cheaper power from renewable sources so that should not the issue. If cost is your concern, as your state representative why our renewable costs are higher than in other states.

We are interested in protecting the solar panels from future shade by future buildings. Without this protection, the legislation makes no sense. We understand Senator Wiener was asked about this at a Town Hall in San Francisco, but, shrugged it off. We are not shrugging it off.

 

Solar Rights: Access to the Sun for Solar Systems

Tags

,

Consumers Access to the Sun

Many solar consumers have questions about whether their neighbors can block access to their solar panels with shading, and whether Covenants, Codes, and Restrictions (CC&Rs) can limit the use of solar. State laws in California protect homeowner access to the sun for solar systems, and these laws have been in place for more than 30 years.

Many homes today are part of planned communities that require a uniform and consistent appearance within the development. According to the Community Association Institute, more than 60 million Americans live in community associations. Unfortunately, planned communities can sometimes try to limit the growth in the use of solar energy, which makes the California Solar Rights Act and the Solar Shade Act popular and important information for homeowner’s considering to go solar…

Solar Rights Act

The Solar Rights Act was created in 1978 (AB 3250, 1978), and it created a legal framework for solar access. The law includes protections to allow consumers access to sunlight (and prevent shading of systems) and to limits the ability of homeowner associations (HOA) and local governments from preventing installation of solar energy systems…

Solar Shade Act

The Solar Shade Act (AB 2321, 1978) provides limited protection to solar energy system owners from shading caused by trees and shrubs on adjacent properties. The law seeks to prevent a property owner from allowing trees or shrubs to shade an existing solar energy system installed on a neighboring property, provided the shading trees or shrubs were planted after the solar collecting device was installed.

Useful Links and Information on Solar Rights

There are two helpful Department of Energy reports, Solar Rights Act and the Solar Easement and the Solar Shade Control Act:

(more)

 

California will require solar panels on all new homes. That’s not necessarily a good thing.

Tags

By : vox – excerpt

More solar is not always and everywhere better.

The California Energy Commission (CEC) recently voted 5-0 to add some new provisions to the state’s building code. Among them is the requirement that as of 2020, all new house and multi-family residences of three stories or fewer, along with all major renovations, must be built with solar panels.

Where solar is not suitable, homeowners must have access to a community solar project or receive efficiency upgrades that compensate. (There are some exceptions for buildings in highly shaded areas.)…

Solar on most new houses! This might seem like an obviously good thing. Solar is great; solar panels are cool; California is leading the climate resistance.

But among energy nerds, the mandate has caused much wringing of hands and gnashing of teeth. They’ve been debating it all week on Twitter — on one hand, on the other; by now there are so many hands that I must confess to paralyzing ambivalence.

So let’s walk through some of the pros and cons and see if we can draw some kind of conclusion… (more)

Hawaii’s Volta Industries opens Mainland headquarters in San Francisco

Tags

, ,

: bizjournals.com – excerpt

Volta Industries recently opened a new office in San Francisco, which will serve as the Honolulu-based electric vehicle charging station firm’s Mainland headquarters.

The office is located at 144 King St. in the heart of the SoMa district, across from AT&T Park where the San Francisco Giants play. It includes 10 full-time employees inside a 4,000-square-feet of office and workshop space with an EV charging station in the parking lot to allow employees and guests to charge their vehicles…

Volta, which operates one of the largest networks of free-to-use EV charging stations across the nation with 50 stations in California, Arizona and Hawaii, has no physical office in Hawaii with a warehouse in Aiea where it handles manufacturing…(more)

Meet the Kickstarter of Solar Energy

Tags

By

Mosaic is trying to radically change solar—by bringing it to everyone.

…In the past few decades, the price of solar panels has plummeted. As the technology becomes more affordable, a variety of pathways have opened up for residential and commercial development, ranging from leasing to bank-financed loans. But despite an array of financing options, mid-sized projects—such as the installation of photovoltaic panels on a community center or a school—often face problems raising money to get off the ground.

That’s where Mosaic comes in.

Mosaic is an online platform that uses crowdfunding to finance investments in solar projects. It works similar to Kickstarter, with individuals posting project ideas to a central, online hub and soliciting incremental donations to fund them… (more)

400 Alabama may seek building height increase.

Tags

, , , ,

Looks like our neighbors at 400 – 440 Alabama anticipate a potential height increase.
We had no notice. Neither did any of the other neighbors we talked to.
We see no building permit. For details on this project see:
http://ec2-50-17-237-182.compute-1.amazonaws.com/PIM/
CEQA Cat Ex Determinationj dated 8/28-2013 was granted:
CatEx/BuildingPermit/201308094015.pdf

400 Alabama

A single site with all a lot of the city projects on it:
http://www.socketsite.com/archives/as_proposed/

San Francisco could explore possibility of mandating solar systems on developments

Tags

, , , , , ,

 by Joshua Sabatini : sfexaminer – excerpt

After two smaller California cities mandated that new developments install solar-energy systems, San Francisco officials are beginning to discuss a similar requirement.
The effort could build on The City’s 2008 Green Building Ordinance and also advance the goal of ensuring 100 percent of San Francisco’s electricity needs come from renewable sources.
“I think that requiring solar panels on new development is a great way to help green our city and create more good-paying clean-energy jobs for San Franciscans,” said Joshua Arce, chairman of the Commission on the Environment.
At an upcoming meeting, Arce intends to ask the commission, which sets policy direction for the Board of Supervisors, to recommend The City adopt a solar installation mandate.
Reserving judgment, board President David Chiu called it an “intriguing idea” and welcomed the conversation to determine if it was something that made sense for The City… (more)

Great idea, but solar installations need a lot of sun to produce enough power to make the system viable. The Plan Bay Area’s highrise stack and pack dense housing projects, will overshadow the solar panels on the rooftops unless someone in Sacramento puts together legislation to protect them. The sunny Eastern neighborhoods are the perfect place to generate solar power. But, only if you limit the building height to 4 or 5 stories . Anything higher can’t produce enough energy to supply the needs of the residents. Tell the supervisors and state legislators that you want to protect the sun on your roof so you can take advantage of all the new government deals on solar. Contact SF Supervisors

Investor Buys Industrial In Gentrifying Mission District

zRants

By Sharon Simonson : theregistrysf.com – excerpt

A joint venture of San Francisco’s Swire Properties and Friedkin Investment Co. has acquired 400 Alabama St. in San Francisco’s Eastern Neighborhoods district, paying $8.1 million, or $158 a foot, according to CBRE Group Inc.

The seller was Elliott & Lucca Properties LLC. Elliott Lucca is a handbag and accessory maker. The brand is one of three owned by The Sak Brand Group.

The 51,270-square-foot office and warehouse building is the West Coast headquarters for The Sak Brand, which has agreed to lease the building from the new owners until the middle of next year as Sak transitions to a new location outside the city.

Sak is a 24-year-old handbag and accessory maker that sells its goods nationally and internationally primarily via department and specialty stores.

Steve Swire of Swire Properties said he is delighted with the location and the building itself, which…

View original post 571 more words